hitlervevo:

Can we all just take a moment to appreciate the fact that this site isn’t filled with advertisements

(via mes-songes)

silentpunk:

loki-the-god-of-sarcasm:

missespeon:

sixstrategos:

sixstrategos:

sixstrategos:

this is what is going on in scotland right now.

dont ignore this.

there is NO coverage of the rioting on the news which is why its so important that you dont ignore this. 
please stay safe if you live in scotland. 

my partner actually went to the yes rally in george square a couple days ago and said the no guys were indeed doing nazi salutes

The unionists have set fire to the building housing The Herald. 
A 15 year old boy is dead. 
The riots continue. 
My friends have been trying to get out of Glasgow and have been attacked. 
Your voter status doesn’t matter to these people, they will attack for no reason. 
Gay SNP councillor Austin Sheridan has been subjected to an unprovoked attack simply because he is a gay man who voted yes.
Homes have been broken into.
There are riots on the streets even outside of Glasgow.
The BNP, UKIP, Britain First and The Orange Lodge are attacking peaceful protestors with flares.
LGBT people are being singled out by the above groups. 
DON’T LET THIS ABHORRENT SITUATION CONTINUE. 
DO NOT LET THIS BE HIDDEN.
PLEASE, DO WHAT YOU CAN. 
MY CITY AND COUNTRY IS UTTER CHAOS. 
I am just trying to stay safe, for now.

Think of all that propaganda the NO campaign spread about the Scottish independence movement being some kind of sinister nationalism.
British nationalism, oh that’s totally fine. No sinister oppressive legacy at all. silentpunk:

loki-the-god-of-sarcasm:

missespeon:

sixstrategos:

sixstrategos:

sixstrategos:

this is what is going on in scotland right now.

dont ignore this.

there is NO coverage of the rioting on the news which is why its so important that you dont ignore this. 
please stay safe if you live in scotland. 

my partner actually went to the yes rally in george square a couple days ago and said the no guys were indeed doing nazi salutes

The unionists have set fire to the building housing The Herald. 
A 15 year old boy is dead. 
The riots continue. 
My friends have been trying to get out of Glasgow and have been attacked. 
Your voter status doesn’t matter to these people, they will attack for no reason. 
Gay SNP councillor Austin Sheridan has been subjected to an unprovoked attack simply because he is a gay man who voted yes.
Homes have been broken into.
There are riots on the streets even outside of Glasgow.
The BNP, UKIP, Britain First and The Orange Lodge are attacking peaceful protestors with flares.
LGBT people are being singled out by the above groups. 
DON’T LET THIS ABHORRENT SITUATION CONTINUE. 
DO NOT LET THIS BE HIDDEN.
PLEASE, DO WHAT YOU CAN. 
MY CITY AND COUNTRY IS UTTER CHAOS. 
I am just trying to stay safe, for now.

Think of all that propaganda the NO campaign spread about the Scottish independence movement being some kind of sinister nationalism.
British nationalism, oh that’s totally fine. No sinister oppressive legacy at all. silentpunk:

loki-the-god-of-sarcasm:

missespeon:

sixstrategos:

sixstrategos:

sixstrategos:

this is what is going on in scotland right now.

dont ignore this.

there is NO coverage of the rioting on the news which is why its so important that you dont ignore this. 
please stay safe if you live in scotland. 

my partner actually went to the yes rally in george square a couple days ago and said the no guys were indeed doing nazi salutes

The unionists have set fire to the building housing The Herald. 
A 15 year old boy is dead. 
The riots continue. 
My friends have been trying to get out of Glasgow and have been attacked. 
Your voter status doesn’t matter to these people, they will attack for no reason. 
Gay SNP councillor Austin Sheridan has been subjected to an unprovoked attack simply because he is a gay man who voted yes.
Homes have been broken into.
There are riots on the streets even outside of Glasgow.
The BNP, UKIP, Britain First and The Orange Lodge are attacking peaceful protestors with flares.
LGBT people are being singled out by the above groups. 
DON’T LET THIS ABHORRENT SITUATION CONTINUE. 
DO NOT LET THIS BE HIDDEN.
PLEASE, DO WHAT YOU CAN. 
MY CITY AND COUNTRY IS UTTER CHAOS. 
I am just trying to stay safe, for now.

Think of all that propaganda the NO campaign spread about the Scottish independence movement being some kind of sinister nationalism.
British nationalism, oh that’s totally fine. No sinister oppressive legacy at all. silentpunk:

loki-the-god-of-sarcasm:

missespeon:

sixstrategos:

sixstrategos:

sixstrategos:

this is what is going on in scotland right now.

dont ignore this.

there is NO coverage of the rioting on the news which is why its so important that you dont ignore this. 
please stay safe if you live in scotland. 

my partner actually went to the yes rally in george square a couple days ago and said the no guys were indeed doing nazi salutes

The unionists have set fire to the building housing The Herald. 
A 15 year old boy is dead. 
The riots continue. 
My friends have been trying to get out of Glasgow and have been attacked. 
Your voter status doesn’t matter to these people, they will attack for no reason. 
Gay SNP councillor Austin Sheridan has been subjected to an unprovoked attack simply because he is a gay man who voted yes.
Homes have been broken into.
There are riots on the streets even outside of Glasgow.
The BNP, UKIP, Britain First and The Orange Lodge are attacking peaceful protestors with flares.
LGBT people are being singled out by the above groups. 
DON’T LET THIS ABHORRENT SITUATION CONTINUE. 
DO NOT LET THIS BE HIDDEN.
PLEASE, DO WHAT YOU CAN. 
MY CITY AND COUNTRY IS UTTER CHAOS. 
I am just trying to stay safe, for now.

Think of all that propaganda the NO campaign spread about the Scottish independence movement being some kind of sinister nationalism.
British nationalism, oh that’s totally fine. No sinister oppressive legacy at all. 

"At what point do you take girls out of school altogether because boys can’t handle it?"

— Parent of a female teen whose school banned leggings (via onlinegf)

(via mes-songes)

hitlervevo:

Can we all just take a moment to appreciate the fact that this site isn’t filled with advertisements

(via mes-songes)

sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video
sizvideos:

Video

sonofbaldwin:

There is blood on the hands of the school administrators, faculty, the bullies, the parents of the bullies who largely think this shit is “normal,” and the culture of violence/might-makes-right that is America.

(via nedahoyin)

nedahoyin:

I love this..nedahoyin:

I love this..nedahoyin:

I love this..nedahoyin:

I love this..nedahoyin:

I love this..nedahoyin:

I love this..nedahoyin:

I love this..nedahoyin:

I love this..

privilegetoengtranslationservice:

sexualremarks:

pyonkotchi:

if you think black women wearing their hair natural is unprofessional you are racist.

if a white woman worked in a store with hair she hadnt brushed and called it her “natural” hair it would still be unprofessional.

Translation:

A black woman’s natural hair is of the same quality as a white woman’s unkempt hair.

(via ox-britishmadebrownsugar-xo)

i-never-gave-a-fuckk:

x
sharmuta:

Remove this staff
ludocris:

yell it from the rooftops

10000bc:

since abercrombie an fitch destroys its unsold clothes and wont donate bc poor people wearing their clothes gives them a bad image i say everyone should donate as much abercrombie and fitch brand clothing that you have to homeless shelters so you can simultaneously piss off a shitty company and help those in need

(via imoutoffuckstogive)

skeleton74:

is he… you know………….straight? not that theres; anything wrong with that i was just asking.. some of my friends are sstraight so im pretty accepting of people like that.Maybe he and i could play foortball toegther, or something Straights like ot do! :)

(via datassium)

beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Wolof people of Mauritania, Gambia and Senegal
Wolof, also spelled Ouolof  speak the Wolof language of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family. 
The nuclear family (father, mother, and children) is the pillar of Wolof life. Whatever misfortune may befall them, family members are there to support each other. The man of the family may officially make the decisions, but the wife and mother runs the household.
Traditionally, when a child comes of age, the mother looks for an appropriate spouse of equal or higher social status. For example, members of the Guer (noble) caste, generally do not marry into the Griot (artist) caste. Similarly, members of the Griot caste do not marry Jam (serfs), whose ancestors were servants. The father waits for the mother’s selection of a prospective spouse for their child and then usually approves it. Prior to traditional Wolof wedding ceremonies, the parents of the groom-to-be sends elders to the girl’s parents with kola nuts and money to ask for her hand in marriage. The girl’s parents consult their daughter and either consent to or reject the proposal.[7] If accepted, the parents of the bride to be distribute the kola nuts among the family and neighbours. This distribution is an informal way of announcing the impending wedding.
The most important Wolof rites of passage are naming ceremonies, circumcisions, and funerals. Much significance is attached to names. Parents carefully choose a name for their children, usually the name of a family member or friend who has influenced them and who will provide a model for their child. The decision may take up to a year.
At age seven to eight, boys are taken from their homes and circumcised in the bush, where they wear white gowns and caps. When they return, they are looked after by a big brother, or Selbe , until they are fully healed. The Selbe educates them about Wolof heroes and legends. After this rite, the community regards them as men.
The vast majority of the Wolof people are Sufi Muslims. The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods, appearing in Wolof communities in the 19th century, grew tremendously in the 20th. Their leaders, or marabouts, exercise a huge cultural and political influence amongst most Muslim communities, most notably the leader of the Mouride brotherhood, Serigne Cheikh Maty Leye Mbacké. The Islam of the Wolof is very tolerant and puts an emphasis on meditation and spirituality…
Read more/ Source: 1| 2| 3



beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Wolof people of Mauritania, Gambia and Senegal
Wolof, also spelled Ouolof  speak the Wolof language of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family. 
The nuclear family (father, mother, and children) is the pillar of Wolof life. Whatever misfortune may befall them, family members are there to support each other. The man of the family may officially make the decisions, but the wife and mother runs the household.
Traditionally, when a child comes of age, the mother looks for an appropriate spouse of equal or higher social status. For example, members of the Guer (noble) caste, generally do not marry into the Griot (artist) caste. Similarly, members of the Griot caste do not marry Jam (serfs), whose ancestors were servants. The father waits for the mother’s selection of a prospective spouse for their child and then usually approves it. Prior to traditional Wolof wedding ceremonies, the parents of the groom-to-be sends elders to the girl’s parents with kola nuts and money to ask for her hand in marriage. The girl’s parents consult their daughter and either consent to or reject the proposal.[7] If accepted, the parents of the bride to be distribute the kola nuts among the family and neighbours. This distribution is an informal way of announcing the impending wedding.
The most important Wolof rites of passage are naming ceremonies, circumcisions, and funerals. Much significance is attached to names. Parents carefully choose a name for their children, usually the name of a family member or friend who has influenced them and who will provide a model for their child. The decision may take up to a year.
At age seven to eight, boys are taken from their homes and circumcised in the bush, where they wear white gowns and caps. When they return, they are looked after by a big brother, or Selbe , until they are fully healed. The Selbe educates them about Wolof heroes and legends. After this rite, the community regards them as men.
The vast majority of the Wolof people are Sufi Muslims. The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods, appearing in Wolof communities in the 19th century, grew tremendously in the 20th. Their leaders, or marabouts, exercise a huge cultural and political influence amongst most Muslim communities, most notably the leader of the Mouride brotherhood, Serigne Cheikh Maty Leye Mbacké. The Islam of the Wolof is very tolerant and puts an emphasis on meditation and spirituality…
Read more/ Source: 1| 2| 3



beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Wolof people of Mauritania, Gambia and Senegal
Wolof, also spelled Ouolof  speak the Wolof language of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family. 
The nuclear family (father, mother, and children) is the pillar of Wolof life. Whatever misfortune may befall them, family members are there to support each other. The man of the family may officially make the decisions, but the wife and mother runs the household.
Traditionally, when a child comes of age, the mother looks for an appropriate spouse of equal or higher social status. For example, members of the Guer (noble) caste, generally do not marry into the Griot (artist) caste. Similarly, members of the Griot caste do not marry Jam (serfs), whose ancestors were servants. The father waits for the mother’s selection of a prospective spouse for their child and then usually approves it. Prior to traditional Wolof wedding ceremonies, the parents of the groom-to-be sends elders to the girl’s parents with kola nuts and money to ask for her hand in marriage. The girl’s parents consult their daughter and either consent to or reject the proposal.[7] If accepted, the parents of the bride to be distribute the kola nuts among the family and neighbours. This distribution is an informal way of announcing the impending wedding.
The most important Wolof rites of passage are naming ceremonies, circumcisions, and funerals. Much significance is attached to names. Parents carefully choose a name for their children, usually the name of a family member or friend who has influenced them and who will provide a model for their child. The decision may take up to a year.
At age seven to eight, boys are taken from their homes and circumcised in the bush, where they wear white gowns and caps. When they return, they are looked after by a big brother, or Selbe , until they are fully healed. The Selbe educates them about Wolof heroes and legends. After this rite, the community regards them as men.
The vast majority of the Wolof people are Sufi Muslims. The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods, appearing in Wolof communities in the 19th century, grew tremendously in the 20th. Their leaders, or marabouts, exercise a huge cultural and political influence amongst most Muslim communities, most notably the leader of the Mouride brotherhood, Serigne Cheikh Maty Leye Mbacké. The Islam of the Wolof is very tolerant and puts an emphasis on meditation and spirituality…
Read more/ Source: 1| 2| 3



beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Wolof people of Mauritania, Gambia and Senegal
Wolof, also spelled Ouolof  speak the Wolof language of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family. 
The nuclear family (father, mother, and children) is the pillar of Wolof life. Whatever misfortune may befall them, family members are there to support each other. The man of the family may officially make the decisions, but the wife and mother runs the household.
Traditionally, when a child comes of age, the mother looks for an appropriate spouse of equal or higher social status. For example, members of the Guer (noble) caste, generally do not marry into the Griot (artist) caste. Similarly, members of the Griot caste do not marry Jam (serfs), whose ancestors were servants. The father waits for the mother’s selection of a prospective spouse for their child and then usually approves it. Prior to traditional Wolof wedding ceremonies, the parents of the groom-to-be sends elders to the girl’s parents with kola nuts and money to ask for her hand in marriage. The girl’s parents consult their daughter and either consent to or reject the proposal.[7] If accepted, the parents of the bride to be distribute the kola nuts among the family and neighbours. This distribution is an informal way of announcing the impending wedding.
The most important Wolof rites of passage are naming ceremonies, circumcisions, and funerals. Much significance is attached to names. Parents carefully choose a name for their children, usually the name of a family member or friend who has influenced them and who will provide a model for their child. The decision may take up to a year.
At age seven to eight, boys are taken from their homes and circumcised in the bush, where they wear white gowns and caps. When they return, they are looked after by a big brother, or Selbe , until they are fully healed. The Selbe educates them about Wolof heroes and legends. After this rite, the community regards them as men.
The vast majority of the Wolof people are Sufi Muslims. The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods, appearing in Wolof communities in the 19th century, grew tremendously in the 20th. Their leaders, or marabouts, exercise a huge cultural and political influence amongst most Muslim communities, most notably the leader of the Mouride brotherhood, Serigne Cheikh Maty Leye Mbacké. The Islam of the Wolof is very tolerant and puts an emphasis on meditation and spirituality…
Read more/ Source: 1| 2| 3



beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Wolof people of Mauritania, Gambia and Senegal
Wolof, also spelled Ouolof  speak the Wolof language of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family. 
The nuclear family (father, mother, and children) is the pillar of Wolof life. Whatever misfortune may befall them, family members are there to support each other. The man of the family may officially make the decisions, but the wife and mother runs the household.
Traditionally, when a child comes of age, the mother looks for an appropriate spouse of equal or higher social status. For example, members of the Guer (noble) caste, generally do not marry into the Griot (artist) caste. Similarly, members of the Griot caste do not marry Jam (serfs), whose ancestors were servants. The father waits for the mother’s selection of a prospective spouse for their child and then usually approves it. Prior to traditional Wolof wedding ceremonies, the parents of the groom-to-be sends elders to the girl’s parents with kola nuts and money to ask for her hand in marriage. The girl’s parents consult their daughter and either consent to or reject the proposal.[7] If accepted, the parents of the bride to be distribute the kola nuts among the family and neighbours. This distribution is an informal way of announcing the impending wedding.
The most important Wolof rites of passage are naming ceremonies, circumcisions, and funerals. Much significance is attached to names. Parents carefully choose a name for their children, usually the name of a family member or friend who has influenced them and who will provide a model for their child. The decision may take up to a year.
At age seven to eight, boys are taken from their homes and circumcised in the bush, where they wear white gowns and caps. When they return, they are looked after by a big brother, or Selbe , until they are fully healed. The Selbe educates them about Wolof heroes and legends. After this rite, the community regards them as men.
The vast majority of the Wolof people are Sufi Muslims. The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods, appearing in Wolof communities in the 19th century, grew tremendously in the 20th. Their leaders, or marabouts, exercise a huge cultural and political influence amongst most Muslim communities, most notably the leader of the Mouride brotherhood, Serigne Cheikh Maty Leye Mbacké. The Islam of the Wolof is very tolerant and puts an emphasis on meditation and spirituality…
Read more/ Source: 1| 2| 3



beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Wolof people of Mauritania, Gambia and Senegal
Wolof, also spelled Ouolof  speak the Wolof language of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family. 
The nuclear family (father, mother, and children) is the pillar of Wolof life. Whatever misfortune may befall them, family members are there to support each other. The man of the family may officially make the decisions, but the wife and mother runs the household.
Traditionally, when a child comes of age, the mother looks for an appropriate spouse of equal or higher social status. For example, members of the Guer (noble) caste, generally do not marry into the Griot (artist) caste. Similarly, members of the Griot caste do not marry Jam (serfs), whose ancestors were servants. The father waits for the mother’s selection of a prospective spouse for their child and then usually approves it. Prior to traditional Wolof wedding ceremonies, the parents of the groom-to-be sends elders to the girl’s parents with kola nuts and money to ask for her hand in marriage. The girl’s parents consult their daughter and either consent to or reject the proposal.[7] If accepted, the parents of the bride to be distribute the kola nuts among the family and neighbours. This distribution is an informal way of announcing the impending wedding.
The most important Wolof rites of passage are naming ceremonies, circumcisions, and funerals. Much significance is attached to names. Parents carefully choose a name for their children, usually the name of a family member or friend who has influenced them and who will provide a model for their child. The decision may take up to a year.
At age seven to eight, boys are taken from their homes and circumcised in the bush, where they wear white gowns and caps. When they return, they are looked after by a big brother, or Selbe , until they are fully healed. The Selbe educates them about Wolof heroes and legends. After this rite, the community regards them as men.
The vast majority of the Wolof people are Sufi Muslims. The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods, appearing in Wolof communities in the 19th century, grew tremendously in the 20th. Their leaders, or marabouts, exercise a huge cultural and political influence amongst most Muslim communities, most notably the leader of the Mouride brotherhood, Serigne Cheikh Maty Leye Mbacké. The Islam of the Wolof is very tolerant and puts an emphasis on meditation and spirituality…
Read more/ Source: 1| 2| 3



beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Wolof people of Mauritania, Gambia and Senegal
Wolof, also spelled Ouolof  speak the Wolof language of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family. 
The nuclear family (father, mother, and children) is the pillar of Wolof life. Whatever misfortune may befall them, family members are there to support each other. The man of the family may officially make the decisions, but the wife and mother runs the household.
Traditionally, when a child comes of age, the mother looks for an appropriate spouse of equal or higher social status. For example, members of the Guer (noble) caste, generally do not marry into the Griot (artist) caste. Similarly, members of the Griot caste do not marry Jam (serfs), whose ancestors were servants. The father waits for the mother’s selection of a prospective spouse for their child and then usually approves it. Prior to traditional Wolof wedding ceremonies, the parents of the groom-to-be sends elders to the girl’s parents with kola nuts and money to ask for her hand in marriage. The girl’s parents consult their daughter and either consent to or reject the proposal.[7] If accepted, the parents of the bride to be distribute the kola nuts among the family and neighbours. This distribution is an informal way of announcing the impending wedding.
The most important Wolof rites of passage are naming ceremonies, circumcisions, and funerals. Much significance is attached to names. Parents carefully choose a name for their children, usually the name of a family member or friend who has influenced them and who will provide a model for their child. The decision may take up to a year.
At age seven to eight, boys are taken from their homes and circumcised in the bush, where they wear white gowns and caps. When they return, they are looked after by a big brother, or Selbe , until they are fully healed. The Selbe educates them about Wolof heroes and legends. After this rite, the community regards them as men.
The vast majority of the Wolof people are Sufi Muslims. The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods, appearing in Wolof communities in the 19th century, grew tremendously in the 20th. Their leaders, or marabouts, exercise a huge cultural and political influence amongst most Muslim communities, most notably the leader of the Mouride brotherhood, Serigne Cheikh Maty Leye Mbacké. The Islam of the Wolof is very tolerant and puts an emphasis on meditation and spirituality…
Read more/ Source: 1| 2| 3



beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Wolof people of Mauritania, Gambia and Senegal
Wolof, also spelled Ouolof  speak the Wolof language of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family. 
The nuclear family (father, mother, and children) is the pillar of Wolof life. Whatever misfortune may befall them, family members are there to support each other. The man of the family may officially make the decisions, but the wife and mother runs the household.
Traditionally, when a child comes of age, the mother looks for an appropriate spouse of equal or higher social status. For example, members of the Guer (noble) caste, generally do not marry into the Griot (artist) caste. Similarly, members of the Griot caste do not marry Jam (serfs), whose ancestors were servants. The father waits for the mother’s selection of a prospective spouse for their child and then usually approves it. Prior to traditional Wolof wedding ceremonies, the parents of the groom-to-be sends elders to the girl’s parents with kola nuts and money to ask for her hand in marriage. The girl’s parents consult their daughter and either consent to or reject the proposal.[7] If accepted, the parents of the bride to be distribute the kola nuts among the family and neighbours. This distribution is an informal way of announcing the impending wedding.
The most important Wolof rites of passage are naming ceremonies, circumcisions, and funerals. Much significance is attached to names. Parents carefully choose a name for their children, usually the name of a family member or friend who has influenced them and who will provide a model for their child. The decision may take up to a year.
At age seven to eight, boys are taken from their homes and circumcised in the bush, where they wear white gowns and caps. When they return, they are looked after by a big brother, or Selbe , until they are fully healed. The Selbe educates them about Wolof heroes and legends. After this rite, the community regards them as men.
The vast majority of the Wolof people are Sufi Muslims. The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods, appearing in Wolof communities in the 19th century, grew tremendously in the 20th. Their leaders, or marabouts, exercise a huge cultural and political influence amongst most Muslim communities, most notably the leader of the Mouride brotherhood, Serigne Cheikh Maty Leye Mbacké. The Islam of the Wolof is very tolerant and puts an emphasis on meditation and spirituality…
Read more/ Source: 1| 2| 3



beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Wolof people of Mauritania, Gambia and Senegal
Wolof, also spelled Ouolof  speak the Wolof language of the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family. 
The nuclear family (father, mother, and children) is the pillar of Wolof life. Whatever misfortune may befall them, family members are there to support each other. The man of the family may officially make the decisions, but the wife and mother runs the household.
Traditionally, when a child comes of age, the mother looks for an appropriate spouse of equal or higher social status. For example, members of the Guer (noble) caste, generally do not marry into the Griot (artist) caste. Similarly, members of the Griot caste do not marry Jam (serfs), whose ancestors were servants. The father waits for the mother’s selection of a prospective spouse for their child and then usually approves it. Prior to traditional Wolof wedding ceremonies, the parents of the groom-to-be sends elders to the girl’s parents with kola nuts and money to ask for her hand in marriage. The girl’s parents consult their daughter and either consent to or reject the proposal.[7] If accepted, the parents of the bride to be distribute the kola nuts among the family and neighbours. This distribution is an informal way of announcing the impending wedding.
The most important Wolof rites of passage are naming ceremonies, circumcisions, and funerals. Much significance is attached to names. Parents carefully choose a name for their children, usually the name of a family member or friend who has influenced them and who will provide a model for their child. The decision may take up to a year.
At age seven to eight, boys are taken from their homes and circumcised in the bush, where they wear white gowns and caps. When they return, they are looked after by a big brother, or Selbe , until they are fully healed. The Selbe educates them about Wolof heroes and legends. After this rite, the community regards them as men.
The vast majority of the Wolof people are Sufi Muslims. The Senegalese Sufi Muslim brotherhoods, appearing in Wolof communities in the 19th century, grew tremendously in the 20th. Their leaders, or marabouts, exercise a huge cultural and political influence amongst most Muslim communities, most notably the leader of the Mouride brotherhood, Serigne Cheikh Maty Leye Mbacké. The Islam of the Wolof is very tolerant and puts an emphasis on meditation and spirituality…
Read more/ Source: 1| 2| 3
hersheywrites:

allthatandadimesack:

lilbitkipsy:

jadedkitten:

The eternal struggle

never did i relate more to Family Guy than this scene


Lol

Swear.